In which I can’t believe that worked

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A quick touch of context– everything I post here gets cross-posted to Facebook, right?  I’ve probably got half my friends blocking me by now.  I have a friend who is Norwegian, both in the ethnic and the “lives there now” sense.   She read today’s post and commented over on Facebook that the lack of Finland was probably because, at least compared to Norwegians and Swedes, Finnish people generally aren’t as likely to be English speakers.

Which is how the last post happened, because I commented– initially as a joke and then I decided to actually do it, because why the hell not– that clearly what was going to be necessary was for me to literally write a post in Finnish and then tag it appropriately.

And then the Internet threw in Iceland as a bonus.  Which is hilarious.  Which country should I do next?  Is Greenlandish a language?

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Luther M. Siler

Teacher, writer of words, and local curmudgeon. Enthusiastically profane. Occasionally hostile.

8 thoughts on “In which I can’t believe that worked

  1. I applaud your linguistic diversity! I can be a good tourist in about 6 languages, but I have not yet been brave enough to take on Finnish. Thank for visiting my blog!

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  2. Whoa! Finnish folks under 40 speak excellent English, your Norwegian friend is wrong.

    Also I think I might borrow your Finnish language experiment on my blog. I already have a Finland category: http://inthebrake.wordpress.com/category/finland/
    That Google translation isn’t perfect, from what I can tell, but my Finnish isn’t good enough to say for sure. Seemed to get the job done, though, so good job!

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  3. Wikipedia pegs the percent of Finns who speak English at 63%, the percent of Swedes who speak English at 89%, and the percent of Norwegians who speak English at 91%. I think “less likely to speak English” is fair, particularly when you’re including a disclaimer about “under 40.”

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  4. One of my favorite bands is from Finland (Poets of the Fall). The singer has a very interesting English dialect; it took me a while to realize English is not completely comfortable for him.

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