Some local election musings; also, math

I did vote by mail– several weeks ago, in fact– but I did not get a sticker. They shoulda included one in the envelope with the ballot, dammit.

Also, the bike has just arrived, so there will probably be another post tonight as I break it trying to put it together. And then I will ride it for the first time– and hell no, that’s not being recorded, I don’t love you enough– fall off, and break a leg, and then we can all agree never to talk about this foolish decision again.

Anyway, Indiana had a primary yesterday. I haven’t talked about it a lot on the blog, because most of my audience isn’t in the Michiana area, much less South Bend specifically, so it wouldn’t be terribly relevant, but there were two local referendum questions on the ballot specifically to raise money for the school district I work for. I have been pretty well convinced for the entirety of this process that we were going to lose; amazingly, it looks like we have won on both counts.

(This is the part where I do math. Skip what’s in between the dividers if you don’t want to see it, but I’d appreciate someone checking my thought process.)


The vote has been stuck at 83% reporting since maybe 9:00 last night; I suspect because absentee ballots account for the remainder of what needs to be counted and that’s going to take a bit longer. However:

So, for question 1, there have been 18,413 ballots cast and Yes currently has a lead of 3,237 votes. I’m going to make the assumption that precincts are roughly the same size, which may not be especially reasonable, which suggests that there are (18413/83 = 221.84, x 100 = 22,184 -18413 = 3,771) 3,371 ballots still left to be counted. I find it highly unlikely that only 134 people who voted absentee voted Yes on question 1, so I think it’s fair to say this passed.

Question 2 is a bit hairier, but using the same process: 18,325 ballots cast, suggesting 22,078 total votes, meaning 3,753 votes are left to be counted against a margin of 2,117. So the vote-by-mail folks would have to break 56-44 against the referendum when all in-person voting was 56-44 for the referendum. That’s possible, but I think it’s unlikely, so I think 2 probably passes as well, but with a lower margin of victory and a higher margin of error.

This is good news! There has not been much of that in 2020 so far. All sorts of fucking awful shit was going to happen in my district without this money. There is still room for plenty more awful shit to happen over the summer, but at least this particular avenue for awfulness looks like it’s probably been closed off.


In other might-be-interesting news: 8% of Republicans voted for Bill Weld, and 76% of Democrats voted for Joe Biden. I was not among them; I sent in my primary ballot before it became sufficiently clear that Tara Reade was not to be trusted, and for that and several other reasons (primary among them being I wanted her to win) I voted for Elizabeth Warren.

For at least the second time in a row, my Congresscritter Jackie Walorski couldn’t break 80% in her primary, even though her opponent’s only qualification for the job was having a penis. I could have sworn I’ve talked about this here in the past but can’t find the post; she’s had basically an invisible primary opponent in the last couple of elections, somebody with no fundraising and no real presence anywhere, and both times that guy has gotten 20%+ of the vote, meaning that Republicans literally shrugged and voted for someone they knew nothing about other than that he had a penis. This guy at least has a website, and the fascinating thing about it is that if you read his Issues page you could be forgiven for thinking that he’s a conservative Democrat. So they not only voted for someone who they knew nothing about, they voted for a fuckin librul, too.

He literally announces elsewhere on the page that he will accept no donations of any kind for this run, so he’s either richer than any man with that facial hair should ever be or he’s a moron. Not sure which.

Speaking of conservative Democrats: there will no doubt be some links to my posts about the last time Jackie Walorski ran for office, where the Democrats managed to run someone who had no interest in actually being a Democrat for the job. By the time the actual election rolled around I hated Mel Hall with a fairly passionate intensity, and I ended up writing in the name of my primary choice, Pat Hackett. I am very pleased to announce that Pat has won her primary and we will have an actual fucking Democrat running for office in IN-02 this year. Redistricting has made this district an uphill climb regardless, but I still think she has a chance of snatching up the seat. We’ll see. At any rate, I’ll be upping the donations I’ve been making to her campaign.

Wait, shit, is that two pieces of good news? Wow.

More later, as I unbox and then destroy the bike.


12:31 PM, Wednesday, June 3: 1,835,681 confirmed cases and 106,312 Americans dead.

In which I make choices

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Pat Hackett

Having looked for transcripts of the two Democratic primary debates and discovered to my faint disgust that they did not exist, I spent the morning digging through both Pat Hackett and Yatish Joshi’s websites.  Accordingly, I’ve decided that while I’d be perfectly happy for either of them to win the nomination, I’ll be voting for Hackett in the primary.   The main things that swung my decision?  Gun control is listed first on Hackett’s “issues” page, and while I’m much more abolitionist than she is, I’m much more abolitionist than absolutely everyone and she has a pretty well-thought-out and achievable plan.  In general, I feel like Pat’s priorities match mine more closely than Yatish’s do at this time.  In addition, personally, if you ask me to pick between the businessman and the adjunct professor I’m going to choose the professor every single time.

The only other St. Joseph County race of note is the county sheriff’s office.  Ordinarily I wouldn’t think too hard about a sheriff primary, but something about the tone of one of the candidates’ ads around town has really rubbed me wrong, and I’ve decided to vote for Bill Redman in the primary.  In this case his issues page and his opponent’s are not all that far apart, but in general I think I’ll vote for the guy whose background is in D.A.R.E. rather than the one whose career path went from narcotics to homicide to SWAT and who brags about being sniper trained on his site.  There is a third candidate, but I feel like if you’re running for office in 2018 and you can’t be bothered to put together a website at all then I’m justified in ending my consideration of your candidacy right then and there.  I suspect just from the volume of yard signs and roadside advertisements and such that this particular race won’t be close (and not in my candidate’s favor) but there you have it.  I may go ahead and go vote tomorrow; we’ll see.


I have read two really good books recently, and while this isn’t the post for book reviews, they’re probably coming.  In the meantime, check out Dread Nation, by Justina Ireland, and Void Black Shadow, by Corey J. White.

In which I deliberate

Early voting just opened for the Indiana primaries yesterday, and as someone who tries his damnedest to never actually vote on Election Day, I probably ought to figure out who I’m voting for.  My Senator is an incumbent and I won’t be voting in the Republican primary to choose his opponent, so the big race is for my Congressional district, to oust the rather odious Jackie Walorski.  Here are the choices:

I have made a decision in the last couple of years: I am dead tired of voting for white men in situations where I have another choice.  I’m sure Mel Hall is perfectly fine and save some sort of disastrous scandal or something like that I’ll very likely vote for him if he wins the primary (possibly important: I have not seen a single speck of polling and have no idea who the frontrunner might be) but I have two non-white-men choices up there and I’m for damn sure picking one of them in the primary.  The only question is which one, and I think in between taking the boy to school tomorrow morning and my dentist appointment (just a cleaning this time, no more pulling teeth) I’m going to read some transcripts of the last couple of primary debates and pick myself a Congresscritter. I think given the current political climate any of the three of them ought to be able to unseat Walorski– my district was reliably Democratic until recent redistricting pulled in a healthy chunk of the more Republican rural areas outside of South Bend, and there are still more than enough Democrats here to get one of us elected if we show up.

Entertaining sidenote: Mrs. Hackett is a married lesbian.  My mayor is a gay man, engaged to be married soon.  I would like to submit that if we send Pat Hackett to Congress, South Bend, Indiana immediately gets to claim the title of the gayest place in America.  I would love to know if there’s anywhere else in the country that can claim that both their mayor and their Congressperson are gay.  Somehow, I doubt there is.